How an Aging Population is Affecting Caregivers

By 2050, the world population of adults ages 60 and older will double to 2.1 billion, according to the World Health Organization. Accompanying that trend will be a heightened demand for caregivers.  Psychological researchers shared their findings on the societal impact of these trends during “Projecting a Future with an Aging Population,” an APS Science […]

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Why writing by hand beats typing for thinking and learning

The laborious process of tracing out our thoughts, letter by letter, on the page is becoming a relic of the past in our screen-dominated world, where text messages and thumb-typed grocery lists have replaced handwritten letters and sticky notes. Electronic keyboards offer obvious efficiency benefits that have undoubtedly boosted our productivity — imagine having to

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Allergies or Sickness? Unraveling the Mystery of Concealing Infectious Diseases

What do you think when people stay quiet about infectious situations? Is it just a small white lie?  In this episode, Under the Cortex hosts Wilson Merrell to discuss his new paper in Psychological Science titled “When and Why People Conceal Infectious Disease.” The conversation with APS’s Özge G. Fischer Baum reviews what disease concealment

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Our Cognitive Bias Toward Novel, Negative Information May Make New Social Groups Seem Less Likeable

People’s biases against the members of other groups are known to arise, at least in part, from self-serving motivational processes that allow us to justify competing for power and resources. Research in Psychological Science suggests that these biases may also have a cognitive basis owing to how we prioritize negative information when encountering new social

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Can scientists ‘solve’ stress? They’re trying.

As modern-day stress ratchets up to what feels like unbearable levels, researchers are striving to learn more about the precise mechanisms through which it affects our body and mind. The hope is that by unlocking more about how stress works physiologically, we can find ways to prevent it from permanently harming people. … Katie McLaughlin,

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Scientists Look Beyond the WEIRD World of Happiness

Quick Take People from WEIRD cultures tend to equate happiness with well-being, but people from collectivist or holistic cultures may place a higher value on meaning, spirituality, and social harmony.  WEIRD cultures often encourage people to pursue the maximum possible levels of happiness, freedom, and other positive states, possibly because historically benign ecological conditions made

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Networking Inside and Outside the Academy

Professional networking can seem like a daunting endeavor for many young scientists and graduate students, especially those considering careers outside of academia. In an APS Professional Development webinar, five psychological scientists shared their own experiences and advice on expanding your relationships not only in academic circles, but in industry as well. Related content: Career Crossroads?

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