The Twisted Paths of Perception

The King Pedro IV Square in Lisbon, Portugal, better known as the Rossio, regales visitors with a delightful exemplar of the traditional pavement called calçada portuguesa. Originally cobbled in 1848, the dizzying light and dark undulations symbolize the sea voyages of Portuguese navigators and predate 20th-century designs by Op Art creators such as Victor Vasarely …

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New Content from Advances in Methods and Practices in Psychological Science

Multilab Direct Replication of Flavell, Beach, and Chinsky (1966): Spontaneous Verbal Rehearsal in a Memory Task as a Function of AgeEmily M. Elliott et al.In 1966, Flavell, Beach, and Chinsky found that children 5 to 6 years old seldom verbalized during a short-term memory task, but verbalizations increased after that age. These findings have been …

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Sex, Drugs, and Genes: Moral Attitudes Share a Genetic Basis

Summary: By studying both identical and fraternal twins, researchers suggest that largely the same heredity factors that influence openness to casual sex also influence a person’s moral views toward recreational drug use. Few hallmarks of the 1960s counterculture stand out like sex, drugs, and rock-n-roll—elements of a “lifestyle” that Life magazine once branded as “antithetical …

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Improving Psychological Science Articles Through Wiki Education

For the past several years, APS has partnered with Wiki Education to improve Wikipedia’s coverage of psychological science content. In fact, APS was one of the first organizations to adopt and promote a Wikipedia initiative among its members, and the results of this partnership are indeed palpable. Wiki Education supports faculty at institutions of higher …

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Sandra Wood Scarr, 1936–2021

APS Past President Sandra Wood Scarr, a pioneer in the study of intellectual development and a 1993 recipient of the APS James McKeen Cattell Award, died on October 6, 2021.  Scarr, a professor emerita at the University of Virginia, Charlottesville, and the first female full professor of psychology at Yale University, studied human development. Scarr investigated the genetic and environmental influences on children’s development—namely, their intelligence. Beyond her academic work, Scarr contributed to the application of psychological research. …

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Mindfulness Meditation can Make Some Americans More Selfish and Less Generous

When Japanese chef Yoshihiro Murata travels, he brings water with him from Japan. He says this is the only way to make truly authentic dashi, the flavorful broth essential to Japanese cuisine. There’s science to back him up: water in Japan is notably softer – which means it has fewer dissolved minerals – than in many other …

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How a Facebook Whistle-Blower Is Stoking the Kids’ Screen Time Debate

The latest burst of recriminations directed at social media emphasizes the harm that can be done to teenagers. Frances Haugen, a former Facebook Inc. product manager turned whistle-blower, says executives at Facebook are aware of research showing the company’s Instagram photo-sharing platform in particular can be detrimental to teenage girls with body-image issues. Even before …

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The Self-Help That No One Needs Right Now

Nothing about The Body Keeps the Score screams “best seller.” Written by the psychiatrist Bessel van der Kolk, the book is a graphic account of his decades-long career treating survivors of traumatic experiences such as rape, incest, and war. Page after page, readers are asked to wrestle with van der Kolk’s theory that trauma can sever the …

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Facebook’s Own Data is Not as Conclusive as You Think About Teens and Mental Health

On Tuesday, Facebook whistleblower Frances Haugen testified before a Senate panel. The hearing’s focus was advertised as “protecting kids online.” … Researchers have worked for decades to tease out the relationship between teen media use and mental health. Although there is debate, they tend to agree that the evidence we’ve seen so far is complex, contradictory and …

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